Intel's Curie Module will power the Chromat Aeros Sports Bra

The Intel Curie Module opens vents on the bra if it senses heat and sweat in order to cool down the wearer.

Published Date
15 - Sep - 2015
| Last Updated
15 - Sep - 2015
 
Intel's Curie Module will power the Chromat Aeros Sports Bra

Everything's better when it's smart. Ever felt your bra isn’t smart enough? Well, good news! Chromat, an American Fashion label, has come together with Intel, to create the Chromat Aeros Sports Bra, a sports bra that can automatically open vents when it detects that the wearer is too hot and sweaty.

The Chromat Aeros Sports Bra uses a memory alloy to open vents when it senses heat and sweat, which then cool down the wearer. The bra has been integrated with Intel's Curie Module and can respond to perspiration, respiration, and body temperature. The aim of the garment is to improve performance by keeping the body from overheating. The Chromat Aeros Sports Bra is available for pre-order for $62, which is approximately Rs. 4,115.

This isn’t the only Intel powered garment that was launched by Chromat. The Chromat Adrenalin Dress that is composed of 3D printed panels and an interlinked, expandable carbon fiber framework. The garment can sense the adrenalin levels of the wearer. The framework on the other hand, can mimic the body’s fight-or-flight mode and extends the wearer’s sensory system to form an imposing shape. The Chromat Adrenalin Dress is available for pre-order for $9,425, which is about Rs. 6,25,443. 

The movements of the sports bra and the dress allow the garments to customise its shape and adapt to the environment. It makes use of a concept known as biomimicry wherein ideas from nature are taken to solve complex human problems.

The Intel Curie module was showcased at this year’s CES and is a tiny, low-powered hardware product that is designed for use in wearables like rings, bands, and glasses. It comes with the Quark SE, an updated version of the Quark chip. It also features a 32-bit microcontroller with 384 kB of flash memory and 80 kB SRAM. It also comes Bluetooth LE, low-power sensor hub and a six-axis combination accelerometer and gyroscope. the device runs on an open source software called Viper that gathers information through activity recognition and built-in features.

Shrey PachecoShrey Pacheco

Writer, gamer, and hater of public transport.