Netlix, Prime Video, Disney+Hotstar and others sign 'self-regulatory' code to avoid censorship by Indian govt

By Digit NewsDesk | Published on 06 Sep 2020
HIGHLIGHTS
  • OTT sites like Netflix, Prime Video, Disney+Hotstar and more have just signed the Universal Self-Regulation Code

  • This move was taken to avoid censorship by the Indian government

  • The code is effective immediately

Netlix, Prime Video, Disney+Hotstar and others sign 'self-regulatory' code to avoid censorship by Indian govt
Netlix, Prime Video, Disney+Hotstar and others sign 'self-regulatory' code to avoid censorship by Indian govt

Get ready for uncensored content on Netflix, Prime Video and Disney+Hotstar to change soon as a self-regulation code has been drafted and signed by 15 of India’s largest streaming companies. This code has not been imposed by the Indian government but rather is more self-regulation by these companies as they would rather not face the wrath of the government and preemptively ‘self-regulate’ content. Companies such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney Plus Hotstar, Zee5, Viacom18’s Voot, ALTBalaji, Eros Now, MX Player, Discovery Plus, Jio Cinema, HoiChoi, Arre, Flickstree, Hungama and Shemaroo have all signed the ‘Universal Self-Regulation Code’which was drafted by the Internet and Mobile Association of India. You can read the entire thing here

Netflix, Prime video, Disney+Hotstar sign self regulation code

First reported by Variety, the code was introduced in 2018. This code essentially came about as the Indian government did not want to impose restrictions on streaming companies and would rather these companies do it themselves. The Universal Self-Regulation Code includes frameworks for age classification, content descriptions as well as the introduction of a ‘grievance reporting mechanism’. This system essentially allows viewers to report non-compliant content. Each company will also set up a consumer complaints department along with an advisory panel to deal with the various grievances and issues that viewers might have with the content on their platforms. According to Variety, “the advisory panel will have at least three members including an independent external advisor and two senior executives from the streamer.”. The code is effective immediately on all the above mentioned streaming sites.  Who knows how this will affect content on streaming platforms in the coming months but if history is anything to go by, we’ll could soon be getting censored content on streaming services, just like we are on television. 

In a statement to the media, a representative from the Internet and Mobile Association of India said, “The goal of this industry-wide effort is to empower consumers with information and tools to assist them in making an informed choice with regard to viewing decisions for them and their families, while at the same time, nurturing creativity and providing creators the freedom to tell the finest stories.”

In other news, Netflix has cancelled its cyberpunk show Altered Carbon, but we’ve got a bunch of shows to help you fill that void. Check it out here. You can also watch select Netflix originals for free, without a subscription, and you can find out how to do that, right here. And finally, Netflix is also testing a shuffle button to help you decide what to watch next. You can read more about that here

 

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