Microsoft Bing gets visual search feature to compete with Google Lens

Bing will let users search the web using their cameras or through images already clicked and stored in the camera roll.

Published Date
23 - Jun - 2018
| Last Updated
23 - Jun - 2018
 
Microsoft Bing gets visual search feature to compete with Google...

Microsoft has launched its own version of the Google Lens. The Microsoft Bing app is now capable of performing Visual Search, but the feature will only be available in the US for now. Bing already leverages computer vision and object recognition in image search and building upon the same, the platform will get new Visual Search capabilities.

“Now you can search, shop, and learn more about your world through the photos you take,” Microsoft said in its blog post.

After making its debut on the Bing iOS and Android app, as well as the Microsoft Launcher for Android, the new Visual Search feature is also rolling out to Microsoft Edge for Android, and will be coming soon to Microsoft Edge for iOS and Bing.com. Users will see a camera button on all these apps and tapping it will bring up the Visual Search feature.

“For example, imagine you see a landmark or flower and want to learn more. Simply take a photo using one of the apps, or upload a picture from your camera roll. Bing will identify the object in question and give you more information by providing additional links to explore.”

Users can also search objects within photos in their camera roll. Uploading an image of clothes or furniture into the app's search box will allow Bing to return visually-similar clothes, prices, and details for where to purchase. This feature is somewhat similar to Google Lens’ ‘Style Match’ tool which was announced by the company at I/O this year.

“We’ll be working hard over the coming months to add more capabilities to Visual Search, so your input on these features is greatly appreciated, as always,” Microsoft wrote concluding its blog post.

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