Twitter updates its policies to ban revenge porn

The micro blogging site has come up with new rules on sharing of intimate pictures. It has strictly prohibited users from posting nude pictures without the subject's consent.

Published Date
12 - Mar - 2015
| Last Updated
12 - Mar - 2015
 
Twitter updates its policies to ban revenge porn

Twitter has updated its policies prohibiting users from posting nude pictures or sexual acts without the subject's consent. The micro blogging website warns that it will block users accounts and hide content if found breaching the new policies.

Twitter in an updated FAQ section says: “You may not publish or post other people's private and confidential information, such as credit card numbers, street address or Social Security/National Identity numbers, without their express authorization and permission. You may not post intimate photos or videos that were taken or distributed without the subject's consent.”

“You may not publish or post direct, specific threats of violence against others,” it added.

Twitter and other social networking websites have been often criticized for not doing enough to prevent such acts. Twitter's new update is certainly a welcome move, and perhaps will encourage other networks to tighten rules around porn and graphical content on the network.

However, the networks have to ensure they don't go on to hurt the freedom of expression on the web. Recently, Google had come under fire for banning “explicit” adult content on Blogger. After the backlash, Google withdrew the policy on posting sexually explicit content.

“We’ve had a ton of feedback, in particular about the introduction of a retroactive change (some people have had accounts for 10+ years), but also about the negative impact on individuals who post sexually explicit content to express their identities. So rather than implement this change, we’ve decided to step up enforcement around our existing policy prohibiting commercial porn,” Google had said.

What do you think about Twitter's new policy on private information? Do you agree/disagree? Let us know your views in the comments section below: