Sega's online database gets hacked, LulzSec offers helping hand

Published Date
20 - Jun - 2011
| Last Updated
20 - Jun - 2011
 
Sega's online database gets hacked, LulzSec offers helping hand

Popular videogame company Sega Corp is the latest to fall victim to the recent spate of cyber attacks. Acknowledging the breach, Sega Corp said that the hackers stole the information of nearly 1.3 million users of its online service from the database. The company further added that information such as birthdays, e-mail address and users' passwords were accessed without permission. However, the company assured no payment information was leaked as it did not store the details of credit cards.

Soon after the hack, Sega Pass page was shut down. The message currently appearing on the web page states, “SEGA Pass is going through some improvements so is currently unavailable for new members to join or existing members to modify their details including resetting passwords. We hope to be back up and running very soon.” [RELATED_ARTICLE]

Rubbing salt into the wound, LulzSec, which has taken credit for many recent cyber attacks, has come out publically in sympathy for Sega. It even offered help to Sega in tracking down the hackers. LulzSec tweets: "@Sega - contact us. We want to help you destroy the hackers that attacked you. We love the Dreamcast, these people are going down." Does that mean LulzSec hated the PS3 and PSP?

The breach is the latest massive hacking incident that apparently exposes the vulnerability of 'Internet security'. Sony and Citibank are two of the most prominent names recently preyed upon. Hackers targeted several websites of Sony including the popular gamer-oriented PlayStation Network. On the other hand, Citigroup's credit card data breach affected millions of people's accounts. Recent attacks on the computer network of the International Monetary Fund, and even the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency's site indicate the hackers are now getting bolder, while their agendas remain unclear. Though most of these attacks were almost harmless (if a little inconvenient) for end-users - we wonder for how long this will remain the case.