Facebook explains its updated Community Standards

Facebook has also barred organisations with links to terror activity, crime and hate promoting. It says it will block content supporting such groups.

Published Date
17 - Mar - 2015
| Last Updated
17 - Jun - 2016
 
Facebook explains its updated Community Standards

Facebook has made some changes to its guidelines for the website and app. According to Facebook's updated community standards, the network may remove or restrict access to content because it breaches a law in a particular country even though it doesn't violate Facebook's guidelines.

Facebook says in a detailed post:

“Today we are providing more detail and clarity on what is and is not allowed. For example, what exactly do we mean by nudity, or what do we mean by hate speech? While our policies and standards themselves are not changing, we have heard from people that it would be helpful to provide more clarity and examples, so we are doing so with today’s update.

We report the number of government requests to restrict content for contravening local law in our Global Government Requests Report, which we are also releasing today. We challenge requests that appear to be unreasonable or overbroad. And if a country requests that we remove content because it is illegal in that country, we will not necessarily remove it from Facebook entirely, but may restrict access to it in the country where it is illegal.

Billions of pieces of content are shared on Facebook every day. We hope these two updates help provide more clarity about the standards we have, whether they are our own Community Standards or those imposed by different laws around the world.”

Facebook has also barred organisations with links to terror activity, crime and hate promoting. It says it will block content supporting such groups.

Facebook's new guidelines are broken into four sections - helping to keep you safe, encouraging respectful behavior, keeping your account and personal information secure and protecting your intellectual property.

Also read: Google withdraws ban on 'explicit' adult content on Blogger