EU data-protection agencies warn of 'repressive action' against Google

Google may face action from EU data-protection agencies provided it fails to respond to a dozen of recommendations related to how it manages user data.

Published Date
19 - Feb - 2013
| Last Updated
19 - Feb - 2013
 
EU data-protection agencies warn of 'repressive action' against G...

Google may be slapped with a hefty fine by European Union data-protection agencies after the Internet company failed to meet a deadline that sought an explanation on bringing its privacy policy in lines with the EU guidelines. France’s National Commission for Computing and Civil Liberties, CNIL slammed Google for failing to provide “any precise and effective” responses to the EU agencies' recommendations.

France’s National Commission for Computing and Civil Liberties, CNIL, in a statement said that EU regulators “are determined to act and continue their investigations” and take “repressive action” by summer.

"In this context, the EU data protection authorities are committed to act and continue their investigations. Therefore, they propose to set up a working group, lead by the CNIL, in order to coordinate their repressive action which should take place before summer," the CNIL added.

Google was quick to respond to CNIL's warning. “Our privacy policy respects European law and allows us to create simpler, more effective services. We have engaged fully with the CNIL throughout this process, and we’ll continue to do so going forward,” said Google in a statement. “We have engaged fully with the CNIL throughout this process and we’ll continue to do so going forward.”

Google has been facing privacy investigations by authorities across the world even as it launches new services to heat up competition with Facebook. The company last year consolidated more than 60 separate product privacy notices into one unified police, drawing ire of the European privacy regulators, who in October last year sought the search engine giant to provide more control to users over their data.

Source: CNET