Don't Be Evil bookmarklet refines Google "Search plus Your World"

Published Date
24 - Jan - 2012
| Last Updated
24 - Jan - 2012
 
Don't Be Evil bookmarklet refines Google "Search plus Your World"

Protesting against Google’s new “Search plus Your World” interface, engineers from Facebook, MySpace and Twitter have joined forces, developing a browser add-on called “Don’t Be Evil,” which delivers social results across a much broader spectrum of social networking sites – and not just from Google . The Don’t Be Evil bookmarklet is available for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari browsers.

Found at focusontheuser.org, the tool is a bookmarklet that works on a per search basis, requiring users to click it to refine search results. After clicking it, users will be able to see more social results for their query, such as Facebook, Flickr, Google , Tumblr, and Twitter. According to the team, the bookmarklet was built using Google’s own services and APIs, and is filtering results using Google’s own algorithms.

Also displayed once you click the Don’t Be Evil on the results page, is the notification “results improved by FocusOnTheUser.org”, and, an updated Google logo, saying “What Google Should Be.”

Google Search plus Your World hadn't gone well with Twitter soon after its launch. The micro blogging site had lashed out Google over changes to its search engine results, dubbing the move as “bad” for users and web publishers. "As we’ve seen time and time again, news breaks first on Twitter,” a statement released by Twitter said. "We’re concerned that as a result of Google’s changes, finding this information will be much harder for everyone."

For now, Search plus Your World has yet to roll out across the world, so most users will not require the Don’t Be Evil bookmarklet yet. Do you have Search plus Your World activated in your region? If so, is the new Don’t Be Evil bookmarklet something you feel you need? Just how well does it work? Let us know in the comments section below.

 

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