How To Start off with Photography: Five Essential Tips

Are you considering picking up a new camera? You may want to give this guide a read in order to make your transition into the world of photography a smooth one.

By Team Digit Published Date
11 - Dec - 2013
| Last Updated
20 - Sep - 2016
How To Start off with Photography: Five Essential Tips

Are you someone who’s always been fascinated by the world of photographs? Always wanted to pickup the camera and shoot images of your own, but didn’t know how to go about it? Well, if you’re stuck in that gear along with many other people, then this guide is for you. In this guide, we’re going to give you few essential guidelines to work along with, in order to make the best out of this new journey you’ve decided to embark on.

Pick the Right Tools
More often than not, you will be told that in art “it’s not the tool, but the artist/talent that matters,” please don’t pay much heed to it. You do need red paint to create the colour red in your painting (or the RIGHT paints that mix together to create the right shade of RED). Similarly, when embarking on this journey, you do need the right tools and it’s very important for you to figure out what those tools are. You could start this journey with a cellphone camera, a basic point and shoot or even the top end DSLRs. What it comes down to, however, is three things; how quick you are at picking up and understanding rules, how comfortable you are with technology and how far would you like to take your photography. If you’re strong on the first two points, then go ahead with an advanced point and shoot. If you’re technologically challenged and just want casual shots, then pick a GOOD cellphone like the Nokia Lumia 1020 or the Sony Xperia Z1. If you feel that photography is going to be your mainstay, then invest in a GOOD DSLR. None of that entry level crap.

Choosing the right tool for the job is paramount!

Spend time with the User Manual
If you’ve decided to go ahead and buy a good point and shoot camera or even a DSLR, we strongly recommend FIRST reading the user manual. We can’t stress enough on how important this is for several reasons. One, it will give you the down-low on EXACTLY what your camera can and cannot do. Nothing like a good session of settings expectations straight. Secondly, if you know that your camera can do a certain thing, but you can’t figure out how, the manual is where you look. All your answers will be within the pages of that fat white booklet. Third, in the event your camera starts to act funny, it’s most likely that the solution will be in the troubleshooting section of the manual. You’d be surprised just how much knowledge and power is held within those few hundred pages!

The user manual is your best friend

Go Shoot!
No seriously. If you have the camera in hand RIGHT NOW, then you stop reading this article and GO SHOOT! Nothing will make you more proficient at taking photos, or improve your understanding of the gear you’re using than actually shooting.

Go Shoot and keep shooting till you've run out of memory cards

Post your Images in Forums
One of the key elements of learning photography for us has been the immense feedback that you could get from the various photographer communities that exist online. When you post a photo, be open to some horrible remarks, but there will be some feedback in there that will really help you improve your skill. Besides, nothing like getting a truck load of creative ideas to go create more stunning images is there?

Critique is essential to the progress of the artist within

Always Have References
Having reference images is quite a helpful in helping you hone your creative vision. These aren’t images you ape, but these are images you look up to for technical perfection; be it in composition, the lighting, the framing, or even the subject. Comparing your image with the reference image will help you fine tune your technique and point out the right path you must take to realizing your artistic visions.

Team DigitTeam Digit

All of us are better than one of us.