Best UX Practices for Intel RealSense Camera (F200) Applications

Published Date
08 - Dec - 2015
| Last Updated
12 - Jan - 2016
 
Best UX Practices for Intel RealSense Camera (F200) Applications

Intel® RealSense™ technology enables us to redefine how we interact with our computing devices, including allowing the user to interact naturally through hand gestures. To help you learn best practices for developing a natural user interface (NUI) application for the F200 camera using the Intel® RealSense™ SDK, members of the Experience Design and Development team within Intel’s Perceptual Computing Group recorded a series of 15 short videos. The goal of the series is to enable you to design a successful user interface experience into your project from the start. The videos cover a broad range of topics, from basics like understanding the user interaction zone and hand tracking considerations to user tutorials and testing. You can watch all the videos packaged into a series or choose individual videos from the list below.

Watch the whole series:

Browse and select topics of interest from the full list of videos:

How to Conduct User Testing | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When developing an Intel® RealSense™ application using a natural user interface it is important to keep the user in mind. User testing is one of the best ways to determine how users are using the features you are providing them. This tutorial gives developers some best practices on how to conduct user testing to create better applications using the F200 depth camera. With Lisa Mauney.

How to Design for Two-Handed Interactions | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

Intel® RealSense™ technology can detect two hands, but there are problems specific to two-handed interactions that you might encounter during development of gesture applications for the F200 depth camera. This tutorial provides some best practices and simple solutions to these issues. With Lisa Mauney.

How to Provide User Tutorials and Instructions | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When using Intel® RealSense™ technology in your application, you may present the end user with one or more new methods of interaction, such as gesture. To ensure a positive experience, you’ll want to provide these users with a guide to help them understand how to interact with the technology. This tutorial covers some best practices you can use to educate and inform your users. With Chandrika Jayant.

How to Minimize User Fatigue: Timing and Repetition | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When designing a natural user interface application for Intel® RealSense™ technology, be sure to account for user fatigue by building in breaks that support the ways users will interact with your application. This tutorial covers some best practices for designing applications built for the F200 depth camera. With Chandrika Jayant.

How to Understand Speed of Motion | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When developing with Intel® RealSense™ technology you need to understand the speed and precision of hand gestures and how that can impact your application’s user experience. This tutorial gives you some best practices focused on how to make your application provide the feedback required to give users a better feeling of control. With Robert Cooksey.

How to Use Background Segmentation/Separation | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

Segmentation is one of the features developers can use with Intel® RealSense™ technology. This tutorial covers some of the best practices for using this feature in applications built for the F200 depth camera. With Robert Cooksey.

How to Understand World Space and Versus Screen Space | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When creating an application for Intel® RealSense™ technology, developers must understand the relationship between the screen space and physical space. This tutorial provides some best practices to help your application better utilize the spaces the F200 depth camera can work in. With Robert Cooksey.

How to Design around Occlusion: Hand and User Blocking | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

A common problem in Intel® RealSense™ application development involving gestures is occlusion, where the user’s hand blocks the screen or one hand covers the other hand. If the application doesn’t handle this situation well, the problem can negatively impact the user experience. This tutorial gives developers some best practices to avoid occlusion problems when using the F200 depth camera. With Lisa Mauney.

How to Minimize User Fatigue: Supporting Natural Motion | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When designing a natural user interface application using Intel® RealSense™ technology, remember that users are interacting within a physical space, and your design should incorporate and support natural motion. This tutorial provides some best practices to help you take into account the real world natural motions of users in your application designed for the F200 depth camera. With Robert Cooksey.

How to Understand the Interaction Zone | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

Understanding the physical space in which a user can interact with your Intel® RealSense™ application is important in ensuring that users have a positive experience with your application. This tutorial covers some best practices for understanding the interaction zones using the F200 depth camera. With Chandrika Jayant.

How to Use Visual Feedback: Interacting with Objects | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

User should always know what objects they can interact with onscreen in an Intel® RealSense™ application. This tutorial discusses some best practices that focus on providing visual feedback that will help your users better interact with objects in the application. With Chandrika Jayant.

How to Minimize User Fatigue: Understanding the Limits of Input Precision | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

Several factors limit input precision in natural user interface applications for Intel® RealSense™ technology. When developing your application, it is important to be forgiving of user interaction that might drift or need a buffer. This tutorial covers several of the best practices that developers can use to mitigate problems that users might have with precise movements. With Robert Cooksey.

How to Develop for Multiple Form Factors | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

When developing your application to take advantage of Intel® RealSense™ technology, you need to be aware of the full range of device types that may be used to interact with your application. Each form factor, including laptops, tablets, and all-in-ones, has a different cone of interaction to take into account. This tutorial gives you some best practices for developing applications across multiple platforms using the F200 depth camera. With Chandrika Jayant.

How to Use Visual Feedback: Cursors | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

In a natural user interface Intel® RealSense™ application, users need to know where they are within the interaction zone in order to give them a sense of control. Providing a cursor onscreen is one of the best ways to manage the user experience. This tutorial gives you some best practices for providing hand location cues when developing an application that uses the F200 depth camera. Chandrika Jayant.

How to Design for Different Range Options | Intel® RealSense™ Camera (F200)

While the F200 camera has a range of 20–120 cm, it doesn't make sense to develop your Intel® RealSense™ application to cover the entire range. This tutorial gives some best practices for using the F200 depth camera range across the different uses that the camera supports. With Lisa Mauney.

For more such Android resources and tools from Intel, please visit the Intel® RealSense™ Developer Zone

Source: https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/best-ux-practices-for-intel-realsense-camera-f200-applications