Anonymous social app 'Secret' gets revamped, adds new features

Secret re-launched with a new look, inbuilt chat and work features.

By Silky Malhotra Published Date
19 - Dec - 2014
| Last Updated
19 - Dec - 2014
Anonymous social app 'Secret' gets revamped, adds new features

Anonymous messaging app Secret has received a major redesign, adds new logo, color scheme and features. Users can download the updated app from the Google Play Store and Apple app store.

Secrets new layout shows users five secrets at a time instead of one or two. The revamped app now features a text based newsfeed similar to Twitter. The anonymous social app has also added private messaging for users, so they can chat from within the app. Similar to snapchat, the messages disappear after they’ve been idle for 24 hours, and the parties involved remain anonymous throughout.

The Secret app lets users contribute anonymous posts to three separate groups now. You can receive updates from Your friends (and friends of friends), your colleagues at work and those nearby. All the groups are completely separate. For E.g., if a users post a secret in the “New York” group, their contacts outside of the city may not see the post even if they’re your friend. The location-based secrets are similar to popular messaging app Yik Yak.

The app has also launched a “Secret for Work” feature which is like the anonymous app Canary. The app is already being used by dozens of companies including employees from Facebook and Google are already using.

The Secret Messaging app launched in February this year and has raised $35 million in funding over a seven-month period, hitting a $100 million valuation and has over 15 million users. According to Secret co-founders David Byttow and Chrys Bader the changes will encourage people to share more on the messaging app.

"We just believe that ideas should be discussed openly — and social networks today make that really hard," Bader says. "We believe that no one should ever have to feel alone — and should be able to put themselves out there, even if they feel like they’re not in the majority. Everything we should do should allow for people to feel more comfortable posting," Bader added.

Source: The Verge